Can’t see the forest for the trees…

March 28, 2017

When we first began hiking the AT in February, a forest of impossibly tall, straight, featureless tree trunks reached high above my eyes, competing for sun and glory in a lacy winter canopy.

As the days turned to weeks, my eyes began noticing small differences.  Colors, textures, patterns … individuality transformed these plain bare trees.  I knew many types of trees by their leaves, but without leaves, I had lumped them all together.  Maples, sourwood, oaks, dogwood, hickory – each had its own bark.  I just didn’t know who was what!

And so I began making friends, recognizing the textures of bark, even though I didn’t know the names of the trees.  Perhaps another hiker will recognize the description of a few of these unknown but new-found friends:

  • Elegant lady – silvery gray bark, as smooth and unblemished as a silk gown
  • Elegant athletic lady – the same smooth silver covering, but with bumps and ripples underneath, as if sporting athletic muscles and tendons under its bark
  • Frilly – a yellow bark, with paper thin curls peeling off in long ringlets
  • Fireproof – thick, chocolate brown armor, with ridges of bark squeezed and separated between deep, sternly parallel furrows running the length of the trunk
  • Flyaway – long rectangular peels of heavy bark, shingled up the tree, curling away at the base, looking as if it is ready to fly off the trunk
  • Background gentleman – a cloudy gray trunk, with ridges of bark that have run amok, separating and merging in a dizzying x-shaped pattern. One’s eyes tend to slide over this trunk, not really noticing it.
  • Background melted gentleman – the same color and pattern as above, but someone has taken an iron and melted all the ridges, leaving shallow grooves between flat pathways around the trunk.
  • Wart – tree so covered in warts and dimples, I can’t see any pattern at all on its bark!

Each day as I hike, I’m not alone.  My Appalachian trail buddies are always there!

IMG_20170326_130350310
This old snag has so much personality, it defies identification!

 

 

Author: Sarah and Jay Bigelow

Hi! We live in the Carson Valley in Nevada near Lake Tahoe. Sarah is a retired elementary school teacher, and Jay is a retired fish biologist. We are in our 50's, and have been married for 30 years.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s